Worth Reading - 6/16

1. The reality is that we don't read our Bibles because we don't want to enough:

If we were to survey Christians at evangelical churches in America most people would agree that they need to read their Bibles. They understand that it is both required and good for them. But the sad truth is, many do not. This lands us in that strange place of knowing, but yet still avoiding, what is good and beneficial for us.

Why do we do it?

Most people when asked about their Bible reading say: I have been really busy. This may be the truth; people are very busy. However, it is not the reason. I think we can distinguish between realities and reasons. Those same people who are really busy do have the time to eat food and sleep. I know people who have their entire day (and evening) mapped out for them. They are extremely busy; yet they still read their Bibles. There is time for even the busiest of us. However, others who claim busyness also are up to date on the news, watch movies, use social media, exercise, and a host of other things. In pursuit of a true diagnosis here, let’s be honest: none of us are truly too busy to read the Bible. We may be busy but we choose to put the Bible aside for one reason or another.

Let me give you a few reasons why many Christians do not regularly read their Bibles.
Elisabeth Elliot, who has been described as one of the most influential Christian women of the 20th century, died yesterday at the age of 88. Here are nine things you should know about this important missionary, author, and speaker:

1. Elisabeth Elliot (née Howard) was born in Belgium, where her parents served as missionaries. She moved to the U.S. as an infant and would go on to attend Wheaton College. At Wheaton she studied classical Greek to enable her to work in the area of unwritten languages during her future missionary work.

2. While at Wheaton, Elliot met her future first husband, Jim Elliot. After graduation, and for five years before their engagement, Jim and Elisabeth served in different parts of Ecuador. Elisabeth eventually accepted Jim’s marriage proposal and the condition attached to it: to learn the Ecuadorian Quichua language before they got married.

3. When work and wonder meet. Dory rowing in the canyon:

One day, while riding down the Colorado River, Amber Shannon suddenly realized her vocation. “I really wanted to row little wooden boats down big rapids with big canyon walls,” she says. “That was the life dream.”

Although it may sound impractical to some, tour guide John Shocklee calls being a boatman in the Grand Canyon “the most coveted job in the world.” “It’s definitely easier to get a PhD than it is to get a dory here in the Grand Canyon,” he says.